2012: a (cyber)space odyssey
Reality

"Most of us exist in a state [in which] our minds are running on without us, keeping us at a distance from that which we love, or from love itself. We justifiably complain of feeling unreal because we are busy keeping ourselves at arm’s length from the biggest reality of all - the transience of which we are a part. Rather than permitting a flow, we impose an interruption that interferes with satisfaction or fulfillment…Successfully permitting an intimate connection requires the ability to embrace impermanence. The flower that blooms for only a single night is indeed a sight to behold."
-Mark Epstein, M.D.

anonymousatheist420:

Via https://www.facebook.com/pages/Henry-Kane-And-Brock-Sherwoods-God-Guns-And-Glory/372884739514230

anonymousatheist420:

Via https://www.facebook.com/pages/Henry-Kane-And-Brock-Sherwoods-God-Guns-And-Glory/372884739514230

prettayprettaygood:

Feel free to show this chart to anyone who opposes the modest military budget cuts that Defense Secretary Hagel recently proposed. You wouldn’t know it from listening to Republican and Democratic talking heads, but the amount of money we devote to defense spending in this country is outrageous.

What if that were education budgets ?

prettayprettaygood:

Feel free to show this chart to anyone who opposes the modest military budget cuts that Defense Secretary Hagel recently proposed. You wouldn’t know it from listening to Republican and Democratic talking heads, but the amount of money we devote to defense spending in this country is outrageous.

What if that were education budgets ?

God requires blood

“It was inevitable that she should accept any inconsistency and cruelty from her deity as all good worshippers do from theirs. All gods who receive homage are cruel. All gods dispense suffering without reason. Otherwise they would not be worshipped. Through indiscriminate suffering men know fear and fear is the most divine emotion. It is the stones for altars and the beginning of wisdom. Half gods are worshipped in wine and flowers. Real gods require blood.”

Excerpt From: Zora Neale Hurston. “Their Eyes Were Watching God.” iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewBook?id=669945077

fishingboatproceeds:

latimes:

Pete Seeger has passed away in New York. He was 94.

"At some point, Pete Seeger decided he’d be a walking, singing reminder of all of America’s history," Bruce Springsteen said at a Madison Square Garden concert marking Seeger’s 90th birthday in 2009. "He’d be a living archive of America’s music and conscience, a testament to the power of song and culture to nudge history along, to push American events towards a more humane and justified ends."

Here’s Seeger performing “Michael, Row the Boat Ashore.”

Seeger famously responded to Woody Guthrie’s “This Machine Kills Fascists” guitar with a banjo that read, “This machine surrounds hate and forces it to surrender.”

prettayprettaygood:

New York Times columnist David Brooks published an editorial yesterday that, remarkably, distinguished itself as among the silliest things he’s ever written (despite some tough competition). In it, he takes us through an unsolicited journey through his teenage experiments with marijuana and…

poetnine:

If you’ve ever done any studying of modern physics or simply existed in a Western civilization, you will undoubtedly have encountered the concept of a black hole (here’s an interesting fact: in French ‘black hole’ is Trous Noir, which is slang for anus, ho ho what). Physicists love to talk about black holes. Perhaps even too much you might have thought? I mean, they’re terrifying and neat - but surely they are no more than exotic trivialities, like a two-headed cow fetus at the state fair.

Not so! Black holes are important because A) we know they exist (we can see stars being eaten by or orbiting invisible massive objects) and B) they break our most current scientific theories. Break with ‘em with a big ol’ black hammer of infinite space-time curvature. And so does the Big Bang, y’know that whole origin of the universe theory. We lack the physics to fully describe either one: both break the theory of relativity and we’ve been trying to patch it up with quantum mechanics in a grand quest for a “Theory of Everything” or “Unified Theory.” That is why, in fact, that physicists will often say: “Time began at the Big Bang” or “Time ends in a black hole” and they do, genuinely, mean that. Before the Big Bang, time did not exist; inside a black hole, time does not flow.

And therein lies an interesting connection: If it’s true that time ends in a black hole and time began in the Big Bang, would it be inaccurate to say that the Big Bang is a time-reversed black hole (aka a ‘white hole’)?

To think about this, let us undertake a journey into the creation of a black hole:

It begins as a big cloud of gas. Over-time, gravity pulls these distant atoms together, much like cosmic Eskimos huddling together for warmth. As these atoms are pulled together, they jostle one another until eventually the star ignites. Nuclear fusion begins, turning hydrogen into helium. At this point, the star is very heavy, enough to bend - but not break - space-time curvature. Think of a bowling ball resting on a large cotton sheet. It’s heavy but its weight is distributed over a large area and so it does not break the sheet. As long as the star can fuel its nuclear fusion, this will remain so: thermal pressure will provide an outward force to balance the inward pressure of gravity (thermal pressure is the same thing that causes your car engine to work, the gas combusting to push pistons up and down). Now, depending on the size of the star, it will often expand, becoming a supergiant or giant star. Eventually, however, the star runs out of fuel and must rely on reactions between heavier elements, reactions that don’t create as much thermal pressure. The star slowly condenses on itself, growing smaller and smaller.

At a certain volume, the further collapse of gravity is prevented by something called electron degeneracy pressure, which is a result of Pauli’s Exclusion Principle (think back to chemistry!), which in turn describes the fact that electrons don’t want to be in the same place and the same state at the same time. Which - basically - you can think of as a form of magnetism: the two poles of a magnet don’t want to touch, do they? Neither do electrons! We all want to be beautiful unique snowflakes and electrons are no exception. At this point, electrons are so compressed that their position is highly known and therefore their velocity is highly variable (that’s Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle). They’re going around wild and crazy, little children with too much energy, refusing to even be contained by the Parental Protons or even Grandfather Gravity. The star at this point is called a white dwarf. A white dwarf is roughly the size of the earth.

However, if Grandfather Gravity is strong enough. It can overcome electron degeneracy pressure, providing enough energy so that Parental Protons ‘capture’ electrons, thereby becoming neutrons. If this happens, the resulting astronomical body is called a neutron star. A neutron star is roughly the size of Manhattan (12 km).

Now if the mass of the star is big enough, gravity will be able to overcome what’s called neutron degeneracy pressure. Neutrons are a lot bigger and therefore pack a lot more punch: colliding with an electron is like being pegged by a tennis ball, colliding with a neutron is like having a skyscraper fall on top of you. Yet, if the star is massive enough, its gravity can overcome even that!

At this point, it’s somewhat unclear what happens. Some theorize that there’s another type of star, called a quark star, even smaller than a neutron star, and barely held up by what we might call “quark degeneracy pressure” whatever that might be.

For the sake of simplicity, let’s skip and jump to our grand, glorious celebrity: The Black Hole! If you’ll recall, I earlier made the analogy of a star as a bowling ball held on the ‘sheet’ of time curvature. Because its weight is spread throughout, it bends but cannot puncture the space-time curvature. Now imagine you were to take that bowling ball and ‘squeeze’ it down, until it’s a big NEEDLE. Same weight, same mass, but much smaller. I’m sure you know what’ll happen: the needle will punch right through the sheet, essentially tearing space-time curvature.

And that’s what a black hole is: an area of infinite spacetime curvature. Time dies, slain by the Massive Bowling Ball Needle of Death: A photon of light in a black hole is trapped -> therefore it moves 0 meters in an infinite period of time yet by the theory of relativity, the speed of light is a constant: 300 million meters per second, regardless of the relative velocity of an observer. Yet if that speed is constant but here we have a photon moving 0 meters at 300 million meters per second… well how much time has elapsed? ZERO. Time must cease to exist in a black hole.

Now cosmic Eskimos and thousand-count cotton spacetime sheets and all that was hopefully fun, but let’s return to our original idea. The notion of the Big Bang / our universe as a time-reversed black hole. I want you to don your Cosmological Detective Fedora and have a gander at that first image I posted and start from the right and see if it doesn’t correspond to the process we just talked about:

Let us say that the Big Rip theory of our universe is correct; matter will be spread out and very cool, much like a low density gas cloud, you might say. Step back from there to our current time, and you can find galaxies, and stars and, before that, the formation of said galaxies and stars. That’s the universe we know, the night sky all a-shiny like a child having too much fun with a jar of glitter. Let’s continue on. Before these large structures could form, electrons had to combine with protons and neutrons to form atoms. Sound anything like what happens in a white dwarf - electrons free of their Parent Proton? The universe at this point is much more compact, and much hotter (like, say, a neutron star…). 3 mins after the big bang, electrons and protons are so hot that light isn’t even emitted. The universe is ‘dark.’ Dark universe, black hole, eh, eh, eh? Before this, electrons and protons can’t even be formed; it’s just a matter of quarks - no pun intended. Similar in nature, to what we might call a quark star, a very… quirky astrological body. All this time, our universe is getting smaller, smaller, smaller and that last jump, from quark star or what have you to singularity occurs rapidly, nigh instantly, a interval of rapid delation into a single point of infinite density, like that single point of infinite density in a black hole.

Coincidence?

Is this place we call the universe simply a black hole travelling backwards in time? Or is the similarity an artifact, resulting from the fact that similar theories have been used to describe and predict both black holes and the big bang?

Let us hope that we may know, sooner rather than later!

wandergraph:

Yesterday I took a rummage through the little bits and pieces accrued from forays into bric-a-brac-tat land. Here’s a miniature face I extracted from a miniature album. Who is this lassie, caught in a tiny scrap stiff sepia-tinged paper. Did she have a nice life? Who’s necklace is she wearing? Where did she go on holiday? Let’s wonder while we look at her. 

wandergraph:

Yesterday I took a rummage through the little bits and pieces accrued from forays into bric-a-brac-tat land. Here’s a miniature face I extracted from a miniature album. Who is this lassie, caught in a tiny scrap stiff sepia-tinged paper. Did she have a nice life? Who’s necklace is she wearing? Where did she go on holiday? Let’s wonder while we look at her. 

wandergraph:

Wearing away, gently.

wandergraph:

Wearing away, gently.

proud-atheist:

Please, don’t feed the churchhttp://proud-atheist.tumblr.com

proud-atheist:

Please, don’t feed the church
http://proud-atheist.tumblr.com